• RITCHIE VALENS

    You have homeless people living under the offices of the health care agency headquarters for mental health and right across the street you have the board of supervisors. Like they haven’t #$%^&*(….seeing the problem for them self’s long, long time ago. So now that someone has brought the issue loud enough, you have one board member so upset and asking why why has nothing been done and where are the funds going? apparently you haven’t done your job either, ojete supervisor. Then others from the board want to use this time and take advantage to glorify themselves and use this big problem to show how much they really care about the homeless issue in Santa Ana. So Bruce lee do is appointing others to do what he and his college’s should of been doing and that is overseeing every agency. Isn’t that what their job consist of? There goes more money been spent and wasted instead of going straight to the homeless to provide them with the daily necessities they need. All you county employees, remember this, thank God you have a job and you are not one of them, but don’t forget, that you can also one day fine yourself going through some real bad hardships. Don’t criticize these individuals for being homeless, dirty and mentally ill, don’t think your superior to them, because you’re not. We are all the same. There are many reasons why someone ends up homeless. I always say to myself, whether it might not sound right. All these county employees who come from south O.C. and the I.E. and L.A. to work here in Santa Ana. Remember if it wasn’t for those individuals who live here and you see day to day requesting services, no matter what agency you work for. If it wasn’t for them, you wouldn’t have a job. That goes for all of you.

  • Jacki Livingston

    The seriousness of the problem is really staggering. Look at the issues: Grandiose Personality Disorder, Sociopathic and Psychotic behavior that can lead to violence (including gun violence), criminal attacks against other people and property, extreme Narcissism, Multiple Personality Disorder, Memory Loss, Lack of Conscience and anti-social disassociative outbursts,

    And that is just the males on the Board.

    It will take YEARS to deal with the mental health issues and violence in upper management at all agencies and the BoS. Will there be any time or money left to help those pesky, inconvenient people we loosely call ‘clients’?

    I say ‘nay’, gents…NAY!

  • RITCHIE VALENS

    So the board of supervisors needs another group of individuals who are going to be selected by bruce lee to do what the board of supervisors should of have been doing long time ago look and see where the money that was funded by the state is going? part of the mental health services act. Whenever something like this comes out to light, about why is there so much homeless people in downtown which much of them, also suffer from a mental illness. Oh let’s do something about it now before the s…. hits the fan. It’s always the same, pure hypocrisy from those who are on the other side of the wall. OJETES

  • octaxpayer

    I assume this means the BOS is looking at themselves as they have many issues.

  • LFOldTimer

    Wait for it. The ad-hoc committee will recommend to form another committee of more paid experts (friends) to end mental illness in 10 years. Never let a good crisis go to waste. Some lucky appointees are about to make a mint.

  • Jasenn Zaejian

    Sadly, Supervisor Do and associates will hear only what has been in the mainstream mental health treatment for the past 30 years. All the deleterious and ineffective treatment strategies that continues to be promoted by the mainstream psychological, psychiatric associations, and universities, including

    the ineffective cognitive behavioral programs, medications no better than placebos, but with damaging side effects, repressive practices in institutionalization, etc. After 30+ years of clinical practice, keeping abreast of effective, innovative procedures, I taught grad school for a few years. I was astonished that the identical curriculum taught to me in school in the 1970s’ continues to be taught to current students, disregarding and/or sanitizing all the innovative clinical strategies and effective treatment approaches that have been developed, practiced with success, and promoted by progressive mental health treatment organizations. OC Mental Health is a firm supporter of failed and ineffective treatment promoted by the mainstream and responsible for a truly demoralizing impasse in the effective treatment of people in need.

    • LFOldTimer

      Hi Jasenn, so based on your many years of experience and expertise in the mental health business, what exactly do you propose to help fix the mental illness problem in OC? Please enlighten us. We’re listening.

      • David Zenger

        We could start by weeding out the Supervisor(s) who display obvious signs of mental and personality dysfunction. Seriously, you can’t let the patients run the asylum and expect improvement.

        • LFOldTimer

          Mental patients generally are not good planners and have a difficult time organizing their thoughts into progressive steps that maximize their personal interests, David. The supervisors strike me as excellent planners to maximize their own personal interests. So in my unprofessional opinion at first glance I would rule out mental illness. But major dysfunction? Oh yes. That’s a very real possibility.

          • David Zenger

            “The supervisors strike me as excellent planners to maximize their own personal interests.”

            Well, that’s how they spend most of their time,true. Surprisingly, they really aren’t even all that good at it. Witness the “ethics” scam and the “Karma the Wonder Wolf Dog” episode. And the never-ending homeless fiascoes where the PR efforts have failed to hide the shallowness of effort or real concern. They just get away with it because almost nobody is watching, and there is no real press in OC.

            But I think megalomania and acute narcissism do qualify as mental dysfunctions in the professional literature. Add to that pretty evident signs of bi-polar behavior (in one case) and you’ve got the profile of individual(s) who have no business being a County Supervisor, let alone having a permit to carry a concealed weapon.

          • LFOldTimer

            We love to blame the politicians the state of the Nation, State, County, _________ (fill in the blank). But the real blame lies with the average voter who is either too stupid to figure it out, too apathetic to care or who actually benefits from the bezzle. Look, as s*rewed up as the system is the voters reelect the incumbents about 90% of the time. Simultaneously the polls show an approval rating of about 20% (or less). So the electeds don’t have a corner on the dysfunction market. 85% of my neighbors couldn’t name their County supervisor if their lives depended on it. The pols have just learned how to make the dysfunction work in their favor.

          • Jasenn Zaejian

            Right on Old Timer.

    • Laura

      Jasenn, what does help? As an auntie of a young lady with a hx of abuse and bipolar disorder, what helps? I fought for my niece for 20 years and she finally took her own life this year. We tried so hard to get her the help she needed. From what I experienced with her, the first step would be far increased access to counselors. I mean forget this once a week if you’re lucky business, I’m talking 3-4 times a week to start with. What do you think of that? And beyond that, I’m seriously asking, if we could dream big for our mental health system what might help?

      • Jasenn Zaejian

        What helps, first and foremost, is dedication by the BOS to allocate sufficient funds to develop client centered progressive residential programs, including job training in areas desired by the client focused on an individual’s own choices, minimal use of psychiatry (medications, ECT, etc). Homelessness housing with those programs. Hiring progressive thinking managerial staff and progressive clinicians that refuse to embrace the main stream marginal treatment programs (as those currently in clinical and administrative management now do) and are well trained in the use of positive contingency management.

        • LFOldTimer

          Thanks for your opinions, Jasenn. But before you can train someone with severe mental illness for an occupation it’s critical to ensure that he can adequately function in society. (ie. get up in the morning to go to work, carry on normal conversation, successfully work with others, etc..). It’s practically impossible for a schizophrenic to accomplish these tasks without regular psychiatric care and anti-psychotic drugs, as schizophrenia is a lifelong illness. Correct? You see, one of the primary duties of public officials is to put the tax dollar to it’s most efficient and effective public use. It wouldn’t be very cost effective to train a schizophrenic for an occupation without constant psychiatric monitoring and care. Progressive sounds nice. But Effective is much more practical in the quest to make progress. And, of course, this is not a one-way street. If care and treatment are provided the recipient must show a dedicated desire to get well and enter into the mainstream of society. This is a very difficult societal problem. We can all agree on that. And we can also agree that government needs to take more effective action to help those who want the help.

          • Jasenn Zaejian

            Besides being what once was referred to as a “beartrapper,” someone who acts as if they don’t have an answer, asks a question, then disagrees or attempts to diminish the person who took the time to answer, with their own preconceived beliefs, you appear to be mirroring the mainstream thinking. I have seen many people with a dx. of schizophrenia function effectively in full time jobs without mainstream treatment. There are numerous research studies that back this up. But I will not do your research for you.

  • Paul Lucas

    As usual which Im thing is common practice among most municipalities, the most effective solutions are overlooked or even obfuscated intentionally in deference to more expensive less effective methods via lobbying by the agencies who benefit more with a status quo.

    • David Zenger

      True.

      The same thing applies to the homeless issue: the more expensive and complicated, the “solution,” the better. Which is why nothing has gotten done despite years of hand-wringing and wailing.