• Jacki Livingston

    Norberto, you should be proud. You used your voice to speak for those not being heard, and now a change is coming. The sad part is that you really do not know how SSA works these days, and they will use every bit of muscle they have to block these positive changes, because it does not fit with their new business model. May I add an idea? Lease a nearby location to someone who is willing to run a laundramat/clothing center for the clients. Clean clothes used to bring tears to my clients’ eyes, even just clean socks. Get some companies like Hanes on board, with donations of clean socks, underwear and sweats. Get some other companies to join the band, like shoe, toiletry, jeans and backpack groups. Get kids involved, let them have school drives for items gently used and so needed, like warm coats and umbrellas. I used to buy ten or twenty of the large reusable shopping bags at stores like Marshalls, for my clients to keep their things in. They were so very grateful for the smallest of comforts. If there was a place where they could shower, wash their clothing and get new items, that would be great! Make it big enough so that hairdressers or cosmetology students could cut hair, and where job fairs could be. Have a closet with gently used or new donated work clothes could be given out. Blankets, sleeping bags, tote bags, gym bags, shoes, socks…such a big list! But when I was at SSA, we were told not to have drives to get needed items. My sister gathered three hundred pairs of socks, with a sign outside her office that said “Sock it to Me!” and a box, and her coworkers responded. In short, people want to help. The powers that be need to let them help, and encourage it. They also have to change how SSA is run, if they have any hope of their involvement. As it is, now, under Ryan? SSA will not be a positive part of this landmark project.

  • Kathleen Tahilramani

    This is a positive step. Hopefully, there will be supportive services for the elderly and young adults leaving foster care. Let’s stay tuned and keep our fingers crossed.

    • Jacki Livingston

      Young people leaving foster care is such a big group and so not talked about. Thank you for mentioning them, because they are a large chunk of the homeless population.

  • David Zenger

    Pet them when they’re nice and swat them on the nose with a rolled up newspaper when they pee on the rug.

    Tomorrow? Another flavor du jour.

    • Jacki Livingston

      Do you live in a house? Do you sleep on cold concrete in the rain? Your cynicism is quite comfortable, from your safe perch. People who have been poor, hungry, alone and without any help generally are a bit more enthused about changes that could help. Yes, I agree with you that the politicians will move on when the cameras go off. But there are a large number of people who genuinely care and want change. Your sarcasm is pretty smug, but then, you have no idea of what it is to stand in the rain and have nothing to eat for days.

      • David Zenger

        And your self-righteousness is getting really boring.

        • Jacki Livingston

          Self -righteousness? No. Passionate. Yes. Angry, definitely. But not self-righteous. But until you live it, and know that terror, you cannot really grasp how far down life can go. You will do things that break your soul. You will forsake every line you swore you would never cross. I am blessed, now, because I have a roof. But I can still remember that feeling. It angers me to see people who are lucky enough to have a home being so dismissive of those who have nothing. These are not all druggies who never tried. Many are children. Many are women. Homeless women are twenty times more likely to be raped. And many are the men and women who volunteered to fight for us. Self righteousness isn’t in play. I have gratitude in my attitude. You might find that uncool. I disagree.

  • dc matthews

    Every city in the county needs a spot. Note in 2014 this went back and forth too.

    http://www.ocweekly.com/news/santa-ana-nimbys-win-again-now-what-6464309 .

    • LFOldTimer

      I’d be an NIMBY too if the County wanted to dump a 200 bed homeless shelter in my neighborhood. Any thinking adult would resist. None of the 5 supes would allow it in their neighborhoods. The concept is completely flawed and unjust. That’s why I defend the good people who live near Kraemer Place even though I live far away. I actually live by the golden rule. I know that’s old fashioned. But it goes along with being an ‘old timer’. And no matter how deviant society becomes I won’t change. There is ‘right’ and there is ‘wrong’. Dumping 200 indigent mentally ill homeless on one neighborhood is morally bankrupt and very ‘wrong’.

      • Jacki Livingston

        I am a thinking adult, and I would welcome it. You call the people near Kraemer Place “good”. You don’t know that they are good. What does that make the homeless? Bad? Being poor is not a crime. Not all homeless are mentally ill. Buying a home is not a reflection of good character. The golden rule is do unto others as you would have done unto you. That goes to the homeless men, women and children in the cold. The fact that a large number of those “bad” homeless are veterans who served our country so the precious home owners could live free? THAT is wrong. The fact that children are cold and hungry in a wealthy country? THAT is wrong. The assumption of those who are lucky enough to sleep in a bed that those who are not so fortunate are somehow less worthy or decent or good or human? That is wrong. I live in a neighborhood of home owners. One is a meth producer, one is a pot dealer, three have loud parties and at least two that I know of beat their wives and kids. Having a roof over your head does not give you any inherent goodness. Being poor does not mean you are bad, or mentally ill. The NIMBY “logic” is failed at its core. Thus, the resistance of those lucky enough to have a home to those who, for whatever reason, are not so fortunate, is a basic affront to every ideal, human or Christian. If we are to be a Christian nation, then we have to live that ideal. Otherwise, let’s stop pretending. The true Golden Rule for the Kraemer whiners is not what one thinks. It is “I got my gold, s**** the rest of you” and that is hypocrisy at its worst. It can happen to them, at any time. They are not good, they are selfish. Period.

        • LFOldTimer

          You so remind me of the flower children of the 60’s who expected those who worked their butts off to earn everything they had to share it with those who didn’t. I see life from both perspectives. But I refuse to dump on the more fortunate to feel better about myself. There should be options in a civilized world.

          • Jacki Livingston

            And you sound like the monarchists, who assume that being of noble blood or landed makes you a good person. You are assuming that those people all worked their behinds off, and I can tell you that is not always the case. You will find just as many bad people in those houses as you will in a homeless shelter. The bottom line, for me, is that we want to point our fingers at the rest of the world, and call ourselves a “Christian Nation” all about liberty and justice. But we don’t live what we preach. That makes us hypocrites. Hypocrisy is the beginning of the end, for any civilization, and those who do not learn from history are destined to repeat it. This was the way of Rome, of Tudor England, or France before the Revolution and Tzarist Russia. Money does not give goodness. Paying a mill for a craptacular cracker box in Anaheim does not make anyone a good person. However, not following the true teachings of Christ means that you cannot call yourself a Christian. We are at the beginning of the end of the USA. Within my lifetime, it will split into three countries, and there will be mass migrations. It cannot survive like this. There will be two separate countries, and Texas, because, really, nobody wants Texas.

  • Paul Lucas

    Good news for once.

  • LFOldTimer

    I’m glad that the homeless are finally getting the help that they need. A civilized society help its downtrodden. If you travel through the civilized nations of western Europe you won’t see masses of homeless people sleeping in the elements like we see in America. In America it’s really a war against the mentally ill. That’s what it comes down to. And they try to blame it on “freedom” and our laws. ha! Yeah, “freedom” in a nation that has BY FAR the largest per capita prison population of any other so-called ‘civilized’ nation on the globe! ha. I guess people are more “free” in America to go to jail than they are in any other country on earth! ha. But the idea of putting a 200 plus bed shelter on Kraemer and, in effect, dumping on the people in those neighborhoods is very wrong. Shelters should be distributed throughout the county. Yep – even on Newport Coast! Dumping homeless on one section of OC is very wrong. And any reasonable and honest person knows that! Now that the County will use the bus depot as a shelter it should drop Kraemer Pl. and start working with all the cities to build their own homeless facilities. All OC homless people shouldn’t be herded to just Santa Ana or Anaheim. Full disclosure: I live in neither of those cities. I am not a NIMBY. I promote human equity and fairness, whenever possible. And this is one of those situations when it is possible.

    • Jacki Livingston

      I do agree with much of this. There should be centers in each city. But Kraemer Place still needs that shelter. Maybe not so big, but they need it, because the location is perfect. No one wants to deal with the homeless, but we all must. There, but for the grace of God, go us all.