Former County Assessor Given Probation for Filing False Election Papers

Print More

Former County Assessor Webster Guillory, who was convicted of two misdemeanor counts of filing false election papers by a jury in November, was sentenced Friday to two years of probation and 240 hours of community service.

Judge Thomas A. Glazier denied a motion by Guillory’s attorney, John Barnett, for acquittal and a new trial.

But he cited Guillory’s long record as a public servant and his lack of a criminal record in deciding to grant probation, rather than the maximum sentence of 2 years in jail and a $2000 fine.

Guillory, 71,, will be placed on probation for 2 years and has until July 8 to complete 30 days or 240 hours of community service. He also must pay a $500 fine.

Guillory said he has not discussed an appeal with his attorney, and declined to comment on the sentencing.

“I did 30 years of community service, they want me to do a little more? That’s fine,” Guillory said after the hearing.

Contact Thy Vo at tvo@voiceofoc.org or follow her on Twitter @thyanhvo.

  • LFOldTimer

    Look, I never voted for Webster Guillory and was disturbed by his substandard performance as our County Assessor. But I’m a fair man. It was apparent to me that Webster was not part of the county ‘in-crowd’. I sensed that many wanted him gone. And based on my overall observations of stuff that goes on in county government that never gets criminally prosecuted, I felt that these charges against Webster were a cheap way to oust him from office. And it worked! Based on the final outcome of the vote – I believe if not for the criminal prosecution that Webster would have been reelected by a fair margin. Don’t blame Webster for that. Blame the stupid uninformed OC electorate. Never underestimate the stupidity of the average California voter. And rarely do they ever surprise me. If there’s one thing I can’t stand in a ‘free’ society it’s selective prosecutions. I was raised and educated to despise it. When I put my hand over my heart and say “with liberty and justice for all” I don’t want to feel like I’m just mouthing empty words. ‘Equality Under the Law’ is supposed to a hallmark of American freedom. I feel that Webster was treated differently than many others would’ve been under same or similar circumstances. And it bothered me as a person who loves the ideals our beloved Nation was created to represent .The voters should decide who remains in or leaves office. Not the prosecutor. It’s unamerican.

    • Greg Diamond

      When he signed the papers, whose signature was he supplanting? Now ask why.

      • LFOldTimer

        What about those in high places who apparently had knowledge of Bustamonte’s depraved and repulsive activities on the County’s clock? There seems to be compelling documented evidence several turned a blind eye. You’re an attorney. Do you learn anythng about accomplice law while acquiring your education? And that’s only one example of the chosen few being allowed to skirt justice. There are many more. Supplanting signatures? ha. Give me a $&#%# break! 🙂

        • Greg Diamond

          He was hiding the identity of the person — a high manager within his department — who on “company time” circulated signatures to County employees within his Department, retrieving them from inside the building and taking them outside of the building (because they didn’t want to cross THAT bright of a line) and telling them (in an inevitably coercive way) to sign it.

          That’s wrong– and frankly it’s corrupt. (Who’s going to say know to their boss or their boss’s boss’s boss?) So there’s your “$&#%# break.”

          Anyway, at the end of it all, the County Establishment did “save him.” Slap on the wrist. Not as clear of an exoneration as when the complaints about the computer system were filed and got the Racky “get rid of these things” treatment, but still a good day for Webster. You should be pleased.

          So, what do you think his “community service” will involve. A little “volunteer work” in the OCDA’s office?

          • LFOldTimer

            It seems that you went out of your way to sidestep the crux of my entire argument from the start. Why? Was it because there is no real counterargument to the basic premise of what I wrote? I would expect for the legal community to be up arms over the County spending beaucoup tax dollars to prosecute a man for “supplanting signatures” while allowing many others in high places to walk away unscathed for acts or omissions of a much greater magnitude. You focus exclusively on Webster. What about the others? IMO it was analagous to going balls to the wall to take down somebody who made a California rolling stop while failing to prosecute hit and run drunk drivers causing serious bodily injury. Why don’t we have a real conversation here and discuss the stuff that really matters? Like ‘Equality Under the Law’?

          • Greg Diamond

            I didn’t sidestep your argument. I think that this is a much more serious issue GIVEN ITS PARTICULAR FACTS than you do — one that leads to concern over a sham investigation conducted by the OCDA office half a decade ago. You appear to know nothing about that, nor to care about it, so what’s left for us to discuss?

            Yes, I’m focusing on Webster. Do you want to know why? Look at the title of the article. Just because you go off on a digression does not mean that I have to follow you.

            I am not sure you have in mind when it comes to other prosecutions that aren’t being done — you may be one of the people in these comments sections who like to fling accusations at Benavides and/or Sarmiento, for example — but whoever it is, Happy Hunting! I’m not scared of investigations of the politicians I favor. I do think that there is terrible selectivity in the OCDA’s office, but for reasons I’ve already expressed I don’t think that Guillory’s case — especially given the wrist slap it ended with — is a real good example of it.

            You disagree. So noted.

          • LFOldTimer

            Look, you chose to engage me. Not vice-versa. If you want to dissect my comment then dissect all of it and it’s primary premise. Otherwise, just make an independent comment without focusing your attention on me and my opinion. That’s what I consider common courtesy on a public comment board. And I don’t have to name names. The ones who frequent the VOC boards know exactly who I’m referring to. If you don’t then do your research. I assume you’re smart enough to figure it out. I’ve made my case rather clear. If you can’t follow the gist of my argument – well – I can be of no further help.
            You and I disagree. So noted.

          • Greg Diamond

            I engaged you because you seemed to think that his prosecution was meritless. I can address a critical relevant point in someone’s comment without feeling the need to address the rest of it, and the gods of bloglympus and blogadia do not frown upon it.

          • LFOldTimer

            Where did I write or imply “meritless”? Now you’re putting words in my mouth. I said that IMO it was a selective prosecution for political purposes. And I came to that conclusion because other high-ranking officials in County government have committed much more egregious offenses, via act or omission, and were allowed to slither away. Targeting minnows while the whales swim off into the horizon with smiles on their faces is no way to run a legitimate government. I suggest that you read my comments more carefully next time before opining on what I actually say. Futhermore, I didn’t digress. Selective prosecution is an integral part of the underlying story.

          • Jacki Livingston

            With all due respect to Mr. Diamond, who I think is a great voice in the community, I have to agree with you. The DA has had boxes of documents on his desk about corruption between the BoS and SSA, with nursing homes not just stealing from patients and taxpayers, but the actual mistreatment of those same patients, some of whom DIED from the mistreatment, while the people who are charged with protecting them (yes, Toddy, you ARE a mandated reporter, dummy), have, instead, profited from their misery. In the grand scheme of things, one has to say that the DA has a certain amount of resources, and a certain amount of time, and instead of going after people causing true harm, they go after this yahoo? Puh-leeze. That is like swatting a fly with a sledgehammer, while letting a six foot tall black widow prance around doing the Macarena.

            Yup…let that image settle in.

  • Greg Diamond

    Misusing county resources to pay for a computer system to sell to other counties, one’s consulting on which was supposed to be one’s retirement plan, is not “community service.”

    • David Zenger

      I can’t imagine anybody hiring Webster as a consultant for anything. Yeah, he got the new ATS done while the PTMS tanked, but I doubt if he could answer a single technical question about it.

      • Greg Diamond

        Didn’t say it was a good plan; said it was his plan.

        Note, though, that he could have headed a consulting firm where he hired the prople with the technical knowledge and it would still make him a “consultant.”

        • LFOldTimer

          Be sure to alert us when Webster Guillory becomes an IT consultant, won’t you? In the meantime I won’t hold my breath. ha.

          • Greg Diamond

            Well, he won’t do so now, because he screwed the entire thing up, allegedly requiring copious amounts of staff time to fix it to the extent it could be fixed.

            But the plan behind the system was to market it — and his own expertise (as manager, not tech) with implementing it — to other counties around the state. Do you deny this? Or is it just now news to you?

          • LFOldTimer

            “But the plan behind the system was to market it — and his own expertise (as manager, not tech) with implementing it — to other counties around the state”
            Did you sit down with Webster and discuss his retirement options over biscuits and coffee? 🙂

          • Greg Diamond

            No I didn’t. But that’s not the only way to learn things.

          • LFOldTimer

            Then enlighten us. Why make such an allegation without providing details to substantiate your claim? Or is that asking too much?

          • Greg Diamond

            If I take the time to do so, I think that it will be in a place a little more visible than the bottom of a comment thread. I’ll go try to find the documents, but I’m not promising anything short term.

          • LFOldTimer

            I’m not going to hold you to it. It’s your choice. All I’m saying is that if you expect me to give your claim any reasonable consideration you’re going to have to show us your goods. Keep in mind that all of us have a wish list for what to do in retirement. I might want to fly the Space Ranger to the moon and upon return perform open brain surgery on a tumor patient. But those who are privy to my wish list may question who’s going to hand me the keys to the Space Ranger and the ultrasonic scalpel. And those would be legitimate questions for sure. If my stated qualifications were “Well, Frank said I could do it”, it’s not going to receive widespread acclaim, regardless of who “Frank” might be. Do we understand each other? I just don’t want you to waste your time. It might be much better spent writing an OJB article on your choice in the next DA election, assuming, of course, that you don’t intend to throw your hat into the ring again. I don’t want you to ruin your chances and lose future votes by virtue of a board comment with a premise full of holes. You could be a very important supporting actor in the next DA race if you play your cards right. I want you to succeed. And with that, sleep well.

          • David Zenger

            How did he screw the entire thing up?

          • Greg Diamond

            Emailing you to talk to a source that you may find interesting.

          • Jacki Livingston

            Now, now, now…to be fair…SSA has promoted and overpaid a sleazy IT “genius” *gigglesnickersnort* who spent his time in the parking lot “mentoring” his underlings out of their underthings, until his wife caught wind of it. He is now married to one of those underlings, who has been mysteriously promoted to senior management, but never at the same spot as our IT genius, because, as women all know, leopards do not change their spots, and dirty dogs always have fleas. If a sleazeball like that can rise to a hundred grand a year, then anything is possible.