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Fullerton City Manager Chris Meyer will retire at the end of the year after more than three decades with the city. His tentative replacement is Parks and Recreation Director Joe Felz.

Meyer, 59, told city officials earlier in the month of his retirement plans, but the decision wasn’t publicly announced until the City Council decided on his replacement.

“The council felt it would be good to have stability in the transition of the leadership of the organization when I retire, and believe Joe, with his long tenure with the city, would provide that stability.”

Once Felz takes over, he will have a six-month trial period. The city will save nearly $20,000 during this period — Meyer earns $212,372 annually, and Felz will be paid at the annual rate of $175,000. If Felz survives the trial period, he will be able to renegotiate his contract.

Mayor Don Bankhead said today that Meyer has done “an outstanding job” in his eight years as city manager. “I think he reached an age where I think he wants to do something else. I have no idea what that is.”

Meyer has worked for the city of Fullerton for 34 years. He began as an intern in the city manager’s office in 1976 and over the years has been an assistant to the city manager, director of administrative services, and acting city manager. The council appointed him city manager in March 2002.

Felz, 51, has worked for the city for 25 years and became director of Parks and Recreation in 2007. Previously, he was an assistant to the city manager and community services supervisor in charge of the department’s Cultural and Events Division.

— TRACY WOOD

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