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Beginning Sept. 20, OC Parks will start repairing all steps at the entrance of Thousand Steps Beach on 9th Street as well as other wooden steps, posts and railings. 

The county will restrict access to the staircase and beach below until the project is done.

The 218-step staircase and expansive beach at the bottom are one of the more popular attractions in Laguna Beach, more commonly known as the Thousand Steps Beach.

Hundreds of people walk up and down these steps daily dodging broken steps and exposed steel rebar. 

After a recent maintenance check, County Park officials deemed “major repairs” necessary to provide safe beach access, according to OC Parks spokesperson Marisa O’Neil.

Thousand Steps beach is known for its sandstone cliffs, tidepools and beach cave — but above all, its long ivy-canopied staircase.

The steps are relatively small and have a steep incline. 

Beach visitors lugging umbrellas, bags and coolers can often be seen pulled off to the side catching their breath. 

“Not the average person could go to this beach. It’s quite the trek,” said Aliso Viejo resident Linda Keys. 

On top of this, they have to hike over broken or chipped stairs.

“You really have to pay attention to the steps because they quite often have some damage where you can twist your ankle if you’re not paying attention,” said Laguna Beach resident Shane Sullivan.

One injury was documented in the last four years, O’Neil said.

The steps have always been crumbly and cracked, according to Sullivan, but it doesn’t deter him from running up and down them or visiting the beach.

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