Ballots are about to arrive in Huntington Beach voters’ mailboxes for a local election that can impact everything from beach access to traffic to housing expansions.

And the Huntington Beach City Council is about to get one of its biggest makeovers in years, with four new council members guaranteed to take their seats after the November election.

To help voters get a clearer sense of the 18 candidates and where they stand, Voice of OC reached out to all of them with a list of 21 questions, and is publishing the answers below.

Several of the questions were submitted by readers in response to a public invitation.

Eighteen candidates are running to take over the seats being left behind by outgoing Councilmembers Mike Posey, Erik Peterson, Kim Carr and Barbara Delgleize. 

Ten of the 18 candidates responded, and each was allowed up to 350 characters per answer, to keep the total length reasonable.

Below is the exact text each candidate submitted in writing for their answers.

To see answers to a specific question, click the links below.

  1. What in your opinion is the biggest issue in your city right now? How would you address it?
  2. What are your thoughts on the current relationship between the city attorney’s office and the city council?
  3. What are your views on the OC Power Authority? What are your thoughts on the city’s role in it?
  4. What, if anything, are you going to do to make the Power Authority more transparent and live up to what it has said it will do for the public? Do you believe the city should pull out of the Power Authority? Why or why not?
  5. Many residents who own manufacturing housing are facing yearly rent increases of 5 to 20 percent. What if anything do you plan to do to address this? Do you support or oppose a long-term move to protect manufactured housing homeowners from these kinds of increases? Why or why not?
  6. What is your position on SB 1439, which passed in the Legislature and would restrict local elected officials from taking official action to benefit campaign donors within certain timeframes of accepting money?
  7. What are your plans to address homelessness in your city?
  8. What are your plans to address the housing crisis? Do you support more affordable housing? If so, what are your plans to increase it?
  9. What is your position on rental assistance and rent stabilization policies in your city to assist those who cannot afford or are at risk of losing housing?
  10. What are your plans for reducing traffic congestion in your city? And what, if any, changes to public transit would you seek?
  11. How do you define public safety? What’s your perspective on how the city can best enhance safety for the public? And what specifically would you do to enhance public safety?
  12. Do you support a systematic implementation of protected bike lanes throughout your district? If so, how would you go about doing that and measuring progress?
  13. What are the main things, if any, you would change about how your city spends its dollars?
  14. Do you believe your city should create additional public pools, libraries and community centers? Why or why not?
  15. What do you think of how the agency you’re running for handles public transparency? Do you have any specific critiques or areas that you feel need improvement?
  16. What, if anything, will you do to make your agency and its elected leaders more transparent and open to constituents?
  17. Do you support publicly posting meeting agendas earlier? If so, how early? And what if any steps would you take to increase public input in budget decisions?
  18. What is your perspective on climate change? And what, if any, action plans do you have to address climate change and protect residents?
  19. What local actions, if any, do you support to reduce greenhouse gas emissions?
  20. Do you believe the last presidential election was stolen?
  21. Do you believe you are participating in a free and fair election process? Subject to the established rules for recounts, will you accept the results of their election, win or lose, as certified?

What in your opinion is the biggest issue in your city right now? How would you address it?

Britton: “Three areas are tied to each other; affordable housing is a part of it. Homelessness impacts First Responder efforts. I alone can’t fix it, it’s collective effort with the CC/residents; no more HHD without the right infrastructure in place and we tackle homelessness as a regional problem. I answer this in detail on my website, bobbybritton.com”

Hanson: “Mobile Home Affordability. I address this in a later question.”

Burns: “Transparency of the City Council. The present majority council has conducted too much business without enough public input or knowledge. They bought buildings for rentals, entered into the power business, acquired a hotel for the homeless, disrespected our elected City Attorney and much more. They have negatively affected our quality of life.”

Hansler: “Preparing for the future means improving infrastructure, preparing for new technologies to reduce costs and improve operations, taking action on social issues (homeless, crime, safety), and protecting precious and limited resources of water, energy, and low density. “

Hardy: “Addressing homelessness will impact many other issues in HB, such as safety, infrastructure, and the environment. As a Councilmember, I voted to approve the navigation center so that the city could enforce its anti-camping and loitering laws. The BeWell mental health support van is a good addition to police efforts to address the homeless.”

Inouye: “The city must convene a committee, which would include all of the City stakeholders, to develop a comprehensive city wide housing plan. This plan would consider the impact of new construction of housing units on traffic, parking, local school attendance and the quality of life for all HB residents.”

Vogler: “Homelessness. As an attorney, I will draft enforceable and constitutionally sound ordinances to clean up our streets and our parks. 2. I will draft a municipal ordinance prohibiting overnight parking on HB streets from 2 am-6 am. These proposals will stop dangerous homelessness, street encampments, reduce traffic, crime, and environmental harm.” 

Fair: “Homelessness is the biggest issue in our city right now. Progress has been made in recent years with the HB Navigation Center and the Homeless Task Force. For the remaining homeless on the streets, we need to better understand why, and we need to leverage all the non-profits, resources, and services available in order to solve the issue.”

Clifford: “I believe the biggest issue is the housing mandate from the RHNA and SCAG. How can we add another 13,000+ housing units when the city does not have the real estate available? The city is being asked to accomplish something which is not feasible. The decision needs to be challenged using data and from a practical perspective. “

Clayton-Tarvin: “Public safety including homelessness issues. The Police, Fire, and Marine Safety departments work together. I will make sure that law enforcement, fire, ambulance services, park rangers, along with marine safety remain the number one priority. Emergencies come down to seconds, and we need experienced public safety officers in a time of crisis.”

What are your thoughts on the current relationship between the city attorney’s office and the city council? 

Britton: “It’s politically divisive along party lines. The CA is elected but needs to work for the CC, so what needs to be put to vote is to appoint the CA instead of electing one. The current amendment tries to address the problem with the wrong solution.”

Hanson: “I respect our City Attorney and would be able to work with him and his successors.” 

Burns: “There is a negative relationship due to this council’s lack of respect for our elected City Attorney.” 

Hansler: “Certain city council members, who are putting their own political interests before the needs of residents, are not able to bully the current city attorney. So they are hoping to add to the costs of residents so they can serve their own political agendas.”

Hardy: “Unfortunately, there are personality conflicts affecting the relationship between the City Attorney and some members of the City Council. Changes to the City Charter should not be based on a specific person, but what is best for the city in general. I am hopeful that new members on the City Council will improve relations with the City Attorney.”

Inouye: “I believe that the City Attorney should be hired by the Huntington Beach City Council. Huntington Beach is the only city in Orange County which elects its city attorney.”

Vogler: “The City Charter separates the Council from the City Attorney to diversity power which act as checks and balances on each other. The Council is attempting to consolidate power in itself, effectively making the City Attorney a “Yes-man”. The independence of the City Attorney exists to prevent the Council from acting unlawfully or unethically. “

Fair: “The current relationship between the city attorney’s office and the city council is strained which is not how our local city government should be operating. It is the city attorney and the city council’s responsibility to work together effectively for the interests of the residents of Huntington Beach that they represent. “

Clifford: “The city attorney and the city council are not working well together. I believe in the division of powers our city charter promotes. Sometimes this results in disagreement, but I believe this is healthy. What isn’t healthy is when charter amendments are proposed to change the power structure and gain more control when disagreements exists.”

Clayton-Tarvin: “Although the City Attorney is elected during general election, per City Charter, he is to function as the municipal attorney of the City Council. He must work for his clients (the 7 council members) as they see fit via majority rule. The Council members are the duly elected representatives of the people. The City Attorney should work for Council.”

What are your views on the OC Power Authority? What are your thoughts on the city’s role in it? 

Britton: “I am an advocate for green energy but I think that the leadership at OCPA has been atrocious and HB should have waited before committing the entire residency to having to now make a tough decision, especially when it seems the cost trends as more expensive with OCPA vice SCE. However, we’re committed now so we need to make the best of it. “

Hanson: “I believe the Orange County Power Authority was an unsuccessful idea.”

Burns: “It is shameful that this city council entered into the OCPA. Our city’s role should be to find a way out of it!!!”

Hansler: “The continuous lack of transparency and communication with the public is a major concern. Again, the political interests of members of the board create a conflict of interest with OC residents.”

Hardy: “When the idea of the OCPA was presented to the City Council I was on, I had many questions that were never answered before a new Council approved HB’s participation. In theory, the OCPA seems like it would be a good idea. In practice, it has been poorly implemented by unqualified leadership. My household has opted out of the OCPA.”

Inouye: “I do not know enough facts about the OC Power Authority to make an informed decision at this time.”

Vogler: “I opted out of the OCPA.”

Fair: “There was a lack of transparency in the roll out of the OC Power Authority. It should have been up to the voters to decide if it’s something we want to pursue as a city. People should be given the choice to enroll only if they want to, and not automatically opted in.”

Clifford: “The OCPA is a boondoggle. They have not been transparent, the process has been mismanaged, and citizens are left holding the bag. The OC Grand Jury has been investigating the OCPA and recently completed their report, “Orange County Power Authority: Come Clean,” which details the mismanagement. Read the report when you have the opportunity. “

ClaytonTarvin: “My view of the OCPA is that it is not functioning properly due to cronyism. I see levels of ineffectiveness regarding how it was staffed. I am concerned that it was not rolled out properly and have concrete evidence of this due to my position as the president of the Ocean View School District. The District has opted out as a commercial rate payer.”

What, if anything, are you going to do to make the Power Authority more transparent and live up to what it has said it will do for the public? Do you believe the city should pull out of the Power Authority? Why or why not?

Britton: “Yes, I will definitely want better transparency from OCPA. I’m not sure we should pull out now because I don’t if there are penalties for doing so. I also want to see HB become more green, but not if it’s cost prohibitive without a clear indication the costs will improve for the residents.” 

Hanson: “I believe Huntington Beach should pull out of the Orange County Power Authority due to a failed rollout, concerns about transparency and economic circumstances making the price larger then that of Southern California Edison.”

Burns: “The OCPA was a scam from the beginning and our city should do whatever possible to get out and distance itself from this mess created and entered into by this council.”

Hansler: “Full transparency and full disclosure must be achieved by any and all legal means possible. Conflicts of interests removed and violators of public trust prosecuted.”

Hardy: “The OCPA meetings should be live streamed. If needed, HB can offer the Council Chambers as a meeting location to accommodate streaming technology. OCPA needs to be run by someone with experience in the power industry. Without a change in leadership or a decrease in prices, HB should investigate leaving the OCPA.”

Inouye: “I do not know enough facts about the OC Power Authority to make an informed decision at this time.”

Vogler: “I would draft a measure for the CIty to pull out of the OCPA because the City should not be acting a power provider. It invites corruption and graft. The people of HB deserved better.”

Fair: “I support the grand jury investigation and independent audit of the OC Power Authority. There should be more oversight of the OCPA operations and information needs to made available to the member cities. I would evaluate the consequences to ensure that the city would not endure any financial liabilities or penalties as a result of pulling out.”

Clifford: “I would require the OCPA to publish their rates compared to SoCal Edison so consumers can make an informed decision regarding whether they want to use their service. Also, the program should never have been an opt-out program, rather an opt-in. Lastly, all OCPA financial reports should be made public. I support the city pulling out of the OCPA.”

Clayton-Tarvin: “See above, until the levels of dysfunction are corrected, the OCPA the City should not take any action. “

Many residents who own manufacturing housing are facing yearly rent increases of 5 to 20 percent. What if anything do you plan to do to address this? Do you support or oppose a long-term move to protect manufactured housing homeowners from these kinds of increases? Why or why not?

Britton: “Mobile homes are different from apartments or other rentals. The home is owned and the lot is rented. There has to be a better accountability, i.e., stabilization, for rent increases. For many people a MH is a good compromise to stay in HB while on a fixed income. I support a long term plan to protect MH owners from predatory rent increases. “

Hanson: “If I am elected I would introduce a Councilman’s item to consider placing on the 2024 ballot a referendum on carveout of the city charter’s rent control ban for mobile home residents “

Burns: “Although unfortunate for these owners of manufactured housing, it is business and was an investment of theirs. “

Hansler: “Rapidly rising costs and California’s overdependence on development as a source of funds and ongoing revenues must be addressed. In the meantime, current rent control policies in cities like LA have not proven effective.”

Hardy: “I support the City Council placing a measure on the 2024 ballot which would “carve out” an exception for mobile home space rents to the city’s rent control prohibition. The ballot measure campaign should be led by mobile home owners. Mobile homes are not actually mobile; they long-term investments for families seeking affordable housing.”

Inouye: “I believe that the city should work with the County, State and Federal governments to develop policies which would protect the mobile home communities from predatory increases in yearly rent.”

Vogler: “I support a Rent Stabilization Ordinance. Senior Citizens on fixed incomes should not be made homeless by wrongful gov’t policies that have created high inflation, wiping out retirements. These conditions are much like the stagflation of the 1970’s where seniors lost their paid-off homes due extreme annual property tax increases and Prop. 13.”

Fair: “I support a long-term move to protect manufactured housing homeowners from these kinds of rent increases, and would support a carve out for mobile homes in the City Charter’s rent control ban in order to protect these homeowners from the rent increases. “

Clifford: “I support protecting manufactured homeowners from large rent increases because their situation is unique; they own their homes so large rent increases affect the price of their asset and the landlord’s cost is theoretically lower than a traditional rental situation because there is no building structure to maintain or insure. “

Clayton-Tarvin: ” I support a rent stabilization carve-out for manufactured senior homeowners in HB, and I will author said resolution to be voted up.”

What is your position on SB 1439, which passed in the Legislature and would restrict local elected officials from taking official action to benefit campaign donors within certain timeframes of accepting money?

Britton: “I support it. As an elected official my responsibility is to the constituents who cast a vote, not special interests.”

Hanson: “I have no objection to SB 1439”

Burns: “Depends on the local officials position. For city council, $620 should not sway an elected official enough to justify any restriction.”

Hansler: “Great action. Let’s enforce it. Better yet, let’s remove money from politics.”

Hardy: “I support SB 1439. As a Planning Commissioner, I was subject to a similar rule and it never quite made sense to me that a Councilmember would not also be required to abstain from participating in the consideration of a project proposed by a significant campaign donor.”

Inouye: “I believe that the time restrictions contained in SB 1439 are not long enough. I would have preferred to see a one year ban.”

Vogler: “I have not studied this matter.”

Fair: “This bill aligns with my values because it is a protection against corruption and conflict of interest. I am running on a platform where I intentionally am not seeking funding from special interest groups. I believe that government representatives should represent their constituents and not campaign donors. “

Clifford: “I support SB1439, although the scope is narrow and it would have been nice to see it expanded.”

Clayton-Tarvin: “As a 3-term elected school board member, I support SB1439 wholeheartedly. Local elected officials, like myself, should be held to the highest standards of excellence and ethical stewardship. Local elected officials are fiduciaries of public funds and trust. Anything less can be viewed as a corruption of professional governance standards. “

What are your plans to address homelessness in your city?

Britton: “It’s not just a HB problem, its regional. We have to work with our neighbors to incorporate a plan that is subsidized by the County. There is an underutilized hospital in Costa Mesa that we could house folks that are a danger to themselves or others where we triage them to find follow on care/solutions. “

Hanson: “I believe we must continue to help those in the shelter at 17631 Cameron Lane while enforcing laws for those who do not want help. We also need to be ready to transition shelters. Homelessness will be a long term effort.”

Burns: “Unleash our City Attorney to exercise our City Charter and then have the police enforce our laws that helps to control homelessness.”

Hansler: “This, like the unfunded liabilities of cities, are highly complex issues. It will take commitment to plans, many of which will be new concepts, and city leadership willing to risk popularity and re-election. Throwing money at the issue and not holding individuals accountable has endangered the non-criminal homeless and residents alike.”

Hardy: “As a Councilmember, I voted for the navigation center so that the city could enforce its anti-camping and loitering laws. The BeWell van is a helpful addition to the work the police department’s Homeless Task Force. There is more to be done, and it should include working with the county and state to improve the quality of life for all HB residents.”

Inouye: “I would continue the work that has been done by the current City Council. The fact that homelessness has decreased by 30% clearly indicates that the City has made significant progress in trying to reduce the homeless population in Huntington Beach.”

Vogler: “See above”

Fair: “To address homelessness, I would work to better understand all the issues and remaining causes why homeless are not taking advantage of the services that our city has to offer. I would research best practices and successful programs that other cities have implemented to learn and evaluate what would work best for our city. “

Clifford: “We need to look at the data because people are homeless for a variety of reasons and each situation should be addressed differently. I support the Navigation Center and support public-private partnerships to help homeless individuals find work and permanent housing. “

Clayton-Tarvin: “My plan cannot be summarized in this space. Please see my compreensive plan here https://www.ginaclaytontarvin.com/plan-for-hbs-homeless” 

What are your plans to address the housing crisis? Do you support more affordable housing? If so, what are your plans to increase it?

Britton: “We have to zone for 13,500 more homes; in order to do that we have to consider High Density Housing. However, no more HHD without sufficient infrastructure; First Responders, parking, mass transit, offset from Beach Blvd. I support more affordable housing in that framework. Residents need to have a vote in the approval process for more HHD. “

Hanson: “I support a section 8 housing voucher program in Huntington Beach to alleviate a heavily impacted Orange County Program”

Burns: “The only housing crisis that I am aware of is the City getting involved with buying and wanting to rent housing. That is not the business of the City.”

Hansler: “Again, a highly complex issue. The failures of past and current governments do not provide a solution – only additional problems. Politicians providing simple solutions to appease residents and garner votes are fooling themselves. Addressing complex issues requires processes and innovation. Think Elon Musk and Space X, etc.”

Hardy: “Currently, only 10% of new housing projects are required to be affordable. If the state’s (excessive) quota for new units in HB is supposed to address affordable housing, then the required affordable units should be at least 20-25%. The city should work with the state to come up with more creative projects than high-density blocks of apartments.”

Inouye: “As I stated in my prior response, I would create a city wide committee, consisting of all of the city stakeholders, to develop a comprehensive city wide building plan.”

Vogler: “Huntington Beach is virtually built out and the current policy of massive overdevelopment is harmful to the people of HB and highly destructive to the environment.”

Fair: “I don’t agree with the state mandating housing quotas, and I am against significantly increasing housing in our city through high density developments since we don’t have the infrastructure to support the mandated population growth. I support finding creative solutions to provide some affordable housing within the existing options for housing.”

Clifford: “I support more affordable housing, but the exact number and proportion should be based on community needs and not a mandate from Sacramento. I would need to obtain data to understand what affordable housing needs the community actually has, and make decisions accordingly. “

Clayton-Tarvin: ” The “housing crisis” should actually be called “affordable housing crisis.” Rental costs and house prices are too damn high driving people out of the state. I have remained staunchly against HDD due to the fact that the developers are not going above and beyond the mandatory minimums for extremely low income housing.”

What is your position on rental assistance and rent stabilization policies in your city to assist those who cannot afford or are at risk of losing housing?

Britton: “I support rent stabilization. Providing more housing will drive rents down for a while, but at some point HB will be full and the only way to increase will be to build up. What is our threshold? “

Hanson: “I support rent stabilization only for mobile home residents.”

Burns: “I do not believe that the City should be involved with rental assistance or rent stabilization.”

Hansler: “See answer above”

Hardy: “I support the use of designated affordable housing funds as allowed by the state and federal government for rental assistance and stabilization.”

Inouye: “I would work with other government agencies to develop legal city policies which would, if possible, provide rental assistance and rent stabilization for those who cannot afford their rent.”

Vogler: “See above”

Fair: “In general, long-term rental assistance should be avoided and short-term rental assistance may be applicable in certain circumstances based on need. I would consider rent stabilization policies in order to support existing tenants.”

Clifford: “Affordable housing exists to provide housing for those with lower incomes; if there is a situation where someone cannot afford their current housing situation there are alternative options in the community. I can support rent stabilization policies if landlords are able to exceed rent increase maximums to account for high inflation. “

Clayton-Tarvin: “I support rental assistance and rent stabilization policies for HB.”

What are your plans for reducing traffic congestion in your city? And what, if any, changes to public transit would you seek?

Britton: “OC needs to build a trolley system like San Diego or the Bay Area. Let’s start it in Huntington Beach.”

Hanson: “I would like to see Rapid Transit in Orange County”

Burns: “I will try to work with other city officials to ease traffic congestion and possibly promote public transit.”

Hansler: “A study decades ago discovered no matter how much the freeways were expanded, new development would create increased traffic congestion. Open space is critical to public safety – once removed from public it is gone forever. Safely connecting open spaces for pedestrian, bike, and even equestrian travel is key insuring domestic tranquility.”

Hardy: “The city should work with OCTA to make it easier for riders to navigate bus routes. Localized shuttle services would be ideal for HB to help get public transportation to neighborhoods. The city should expand the Circuit shuttle service downtown both geographically and for younger riders. More “smart streets” would help traffic flow improve.”

Inouye: “I would work with a traffic specialist to evaluate our current traffic patterns for the purpose of developing strategies which would reduce the traffic congestion in the City.”

Vogler: “It is impossible to reduce traffic while promoting overdevelopment. These two things are mutually exclusive and unrealistic. The government should not trying to force HB residents non-existent public transportation when the people so clearly want the independence of driving a car.”

Fair: “We should use data analytics to study the city’s current traffic patterns and use modeling to see if there’s more efficient traffic signal configurations to improve traffic flow. I am in favor of forming a committee to evaluate if a city shuttle system would be beneficial for residents and our local businesses to help get people around our city.”

Clifford: “One way to reduce traffic congestion is to reduce housing development and keep the population stagnant. Also, promoting bike riding and setting up designated bike paths and bike parking would help. Another idea is rail transit; if Amtrak was granted rights to the Union Pacific Freight line perhaps we could bring passenger rail to HB.”

Clayton-Tarvin: “My transportation vision for Huntington Beach over the next several decades. I see mass transit (e.g., MetroLink, light rail, high-speed rail, buses), intermodal connectivity, new routes connecting Orange County to the Inland Empire, and bicycle routes.”

How do you define public safety? What’s your perspective on how the city can best enhance safety for the public? And what specifically would you do to enhance public safety?

Britton: “When citizens can walk around their neighborhood at night and feel safe is my benchmark. Public safety starts with the government providing all the resources needed for the Police Department, giving guidelines for ethical policing, and then allowing the PD to do their job.”

Hanson: “I believe that we can enhance public safety by increasing trust and funding for the Huntington Beach Police Department “

Burns: “Public safety is having the police enforce our laws and other public services (ie., Fire Dept. and Public works) work on infrastructure that assists with safe travel and facilities. The city can best enhance this safety by providing these services with our full support of the government. I would support these services to do their jobs.”

Hansler: “Public safety starts with K12 education – education provides hope and opportunity. While OC has the best law enforcement agencies in the US, continuous improvement is desired. The harsh reality is high density increases crime. If basic resources such as water, food, and energy are insufficient, no one will be safe.”

Hardy: “Recruitment is a challenge for police, fire, and marine safety throughout OC. HB needs to be competitive in salary and benefits to attract the top employees. Well-staffed departments enhance safety for the public. This is also important in our public works department which enhances safety through the maintenance of our infrastructure and parks.”

Inouye: “Legal scholars normally define safety as “the protection of the general public”. In order to enhance safety for the general pubic, I would convene a meeting of all of the HB stakeholders for the purpose of identifying areas in which public safety can be improved/enhanced.”

Vogler: “The number one responsibility of the HB City Council is to provide public safety to its residents. The currency City Council is failing to do that. I would like to see our peace officers be increased to a per capita par with other cities the size of HB.”

Fair: “Public safety is being able to go out into the community without worrying about being robbed or physically or verbally assaulted. It would also include feeling safe in our homes and local businesses without having to worry about any crimes happening to us or to our property. We need to deter crime through stricter code enforcement.”

Clifford: “People should be comfortable outside, not have to worry about crime, and know critical services are readily available. We need to keep funding our public safety personnel and make sure they have the tools to perform their duties. We should create more programs similar to Be Well OC so law enforcement can focus on immediate public safety threats.”

Clayton-Tarvin: “True public safety goes beyond just police. I have been active in working to build partnerships to reduce crime and keep guns off our streets. On the City Council, I will ensure our first responders are fully funded and work to expand mental health services. I will continue my work to expand crime prevention programs.”

Do you support a systematic implementation of protected bike lanes throughout your district? If so, how would you go about doing that and measuring progress?

Britton: “Yes, but a better priority is getting a handle on the proliferation of e-bikes and their use like motorcycles. They are a danger to themselves and other motorists. “

Hanson: “I am open to cycling and other infrastructure improvements on a location by location basis.”

Burns: “I need to look into this subject deeper and have an open mind on this subject.”

Hansler: “Absolutely and include pedestrian, equestrian, and electric personal units (skateboards, etc.). Current designs need improvement. Again, these are complex issues and voters falling for quick fix promises from politicians will be disappointed by the results.”

Hardy: “As a Councilmember, I served on the bicycle safety sub-committee. I am pleased to see the master plan beginning to be implemented. In particular, the creation of protected bike lanes from cars along Delaware and people along the beach bluffs are successful and should be expanded throughout the city.”

Inouye: “I would convene a committee to make an evaluation/proposal of protected bike lanes throughout the city of Huntington Beach”

Vogler: “No. These lanes restrict the free flow of traffic, and goods and services. “

Fair: “I would evaluate the data to see how frequently we have incidents where a protected bike lane could have prevented an accident and also take a look at how effective protected bike lanes are in the areas where they have been implemented to ensure that we are making the decision based on facts and data.”

Clifford: “Huntington Beach is a bike-friendly city, I support areas with protected bike lanes. However, there needs to be designated roads where bike lanes are protected; there are many busy vehicle transportation corridors where it isn’t safe nor does it make sense to put bike lanes. A logical bike lane plan needs to be adopted.”

Clayton-Tarvin: ” Yes, I support a systematic implementation of protected bike lanes in HB.”

What are the main things, if any, you would change about how your city spends its dollars?

Britton: “Public safety is priority number one for the government, closely followed by the environment. Those two areas would be my priority for funding execution, albeit smartly and ethically. “

Hanson: “I would like to see increased funding for parks and police”

Burns: “I would definitely encourage responsible fiscal practices and stick to the basics of the purposes of a municipal government of public safety, public services, infrastructure and fiscal responsibility with tax dollars. “

Hansler: “Greater communication and transparency is critical. The days of behind close doors decisions has contributed to the political corruption we are seeing in every city and the county.”

Hardy: “Spending should be planned during the annual budget process. When additional expenditures are proposed at other times of the year, the Council usually asks the City Manager, “Can we afford this?” The answer is usually, “If you want it we’ll find a way.” Such off-budget expenditures should be approved only when opportunity costs are clearly defined.”

Inouye: “I would need to review the City`s financial statements/budgets before I could make any recommendations regarding the spending of monies by the City/City Council.”

Vogler: “The number one responsibility of any city is public safety. The City should budget for these services first and foremost, then utilities, roads, street lighting, etc.”

Fair: “I agree with spending on improving the quality of life for our residents and businesses by increasing funding to support public safety, infrastructure, and community programs. I would evaluate ideas for bolstering local businesses and assess the business case and potential return on investment.”

Clifford: “The city needs to spend more on infrastructure and add to its community service offerings. This includes fiber optic cable, solar panels, roads, sewer, and electric vehicle charging infrastructure (which can become a revenue source). With an aging population, we should add critical services for its seniors including recreation opportunities.”

Clayton-Tarvin: “More spending on modernization of aging facilities. More funds need to be used to mitigate environmental disasters like the Magnolia Tank Farm, Ascon Super Fund Dump Site, and old oil pumps in fields. The City needs to get serious about public transportation and get cars off the streets. “

Do you believe your city should create additional public pools, libraries and community centers? Why or why not?

Britton: “Yes, but not yet. We have 72 parks we’re doing ok in maintaining, and our central library needs repairs. But…we have to account for some immediate expenses in infrastructure. There are several fire stations that need to be redone or we need new buildings. The Police Headquarters is old and so is City Hall. These are all costly. “

Hanson: “Parks make life better and I am open to adding additional parks facilities and apperati”

Burns: “Not at this time. I believe these facilities are adequate at this time…but open to being enlightened if wrong.”

Hansler: “Why are you not asking about open space and connecting of open spaces? These are critical for a positive human existence and the environment. LIbrary attendance is down, soaring energy costs affect pool maintenance, and community centers are magnets for certain criminal elements including the criminal homeless.”

Hardy: “I would love to see the city provide more community service opportunities. In particular, I would like to see the Banning Branch library rebuilt to better serve the Southeast neighborhood. Of course, financial constraints are an obstacle, but the library project is doable with a public-private partnership.”

Inouye: “I would make a determination regarding the need for additional public facilities based upon the findings of the comprehensive housing committee that I would convene to develop a comprehensive city wide housing plan.”

Vogler: “No. The current economy does not support expanding discretionary public expenses.”

Fair: “I would use a data driven approach to evaluate whether what we have currently in terms of public pools, libraries, and community centers is sufficient for our city or if more is needed.”

Clifford: “Yes. Our city’s pool is almost 100 years old and I would lead the charge for a new municipal swimming pool. HB’s culture values recreation and swimming is a major part of that. I would consider other services as needed.”

Clayton-Tarvin: “Yes, absolutely Huntington Beach should create additional public pools, libraries, and community centers. City government should offer expanded public facilities, because the school districts currently are the only ones providing playing fields, pools, and civic center spaces.”

What do you think of how the agency you’re running for handles public transparency? Do you have any specific critiques or areas that you feel need improvement?

Britton: “I think the City Council can do better with their messaging. They have a couple of outlets for information dissemination and anyone can access the City Council meeting notes/videos, but information provided isn’t necessarily absorbed. The CC should approach what they are doing and why like a marketing campaign. “

Hanson: “Transparency can always be improved. I feel Huntington Beach does a relatively good job on this issue”

Burns: “The council is not transparent. Using JPA’s for issuing bonds without public knowledge, true reasons for buying/acquiring housing and a hotel, trying to silence residents at council meetings, being passive on supporting the Police to enforce our laws….terrible.”

Hansler: “Terrible. Candidates make promises they don’t intend to keep and serve their own political interests and supporters before residents. Get money out of local politics and prove it can be done.”

Hardy: “A top priority of mine when I return to the Council is to have the entire staff go through their required biennial Brown Act training in the Council Chambers with public access. It will be helpful for the citizens of HB to see what the training for Councilmembers and staff includes and enable the residents to keep everyone accountable.”

Inouye: “I would make my decisions/evaluations regarding this question once I become a member of the Huntington Beach City Council and I receive questions/concerns from the residents of HB about the question of transparency.”

Vogler: “I would like to see greater public transparency in all aspects of government.”

Fair: “I appreciate the way that city council meetings are run to allow for public transparency, but there are opportunities for improvement. For example, opting us into the OC Power Authority was not a transparent action. “

Clifford: “I do not believe transparency is a priority for the current city council. From the OCPA debacle to the attempt to modify the city’s charter for their own benefit, improvement is needed. The city council should listen to the needs of the community more often.”

Clayton-Tarvin: “See answer below. The City of HB has issues with transparency. The City Attorney office has mishandled CPRAs. Unacceptable “

What, if anything, will you do to make your agency and its elected leaders more transparent and open to constituents?

Britton: “The Council should run their steady state operations more like a campaign; solicit their ideas at meet and greets, then listen to the feedback. They attend an insane amount of meetings once on the council, which impacts their ability to interact with residents. If they can’t personally interact they need to create a better way to receive feedback.”

Hanson: “I would like the city to have more town halls.”

Burns: “I will encourage public input and listen to their concerns and welcome ideas and involvement.”

Hansler: “Open the books and change the interactions with the public. It will take dialogue, experimentation, and leadership risk. Candidates with political aspirations will never undertake this course.”

Hardy: “When a request was made, I was always willing to meet with anyone. In 2020, I supported limiting the public speaking time during Council meetings. If I had known that the practice would continue for less solid reasons, I would not have limited speaking time in 2020. I will support a full 3 minutes of speaking time for everyone in the future.”

Inouye: “I would ask the public to meet/communicate any comments/suggestions that they might have re: how the City Council can become more transparent and open to constituents.”

Vogler: “Instruct the city staff to be more open to public records requests.”

Fair: “It’s important for the city council to be transparent in their operations and to be open to listening to constituents because it is their role to serve the people of the city. As a city council member, I would be a voice for the people of Huntington Beach and would make myself available to listen to concerns and to answer questions. “

Clifford: “Transparency is critical in government, and I would support more ad hoc meetings with the public and town hall discussions. It shouldn’t be assumed that the council knows best on all issues; major issues may require further public input. “

Clayton-Tarvin: “See answer below. The City of HB has issues with transparency. The City Attorney office has mishandled CPRAs. Unacceptable.”

Do you support publicly posting meeting agendas earlier? If so, how early? And what if any steps would you take to increase public input in budget decisions? 

Britton: “Yes. 30 days is reasonable. Non emergent budget requirements at a certain monetary threshold should be voted on as much as possible. “

Hanson: “I believe the agenda posting time is satisfactory”

Burns: “Yes. The meeting agenda should be posted, subject to possible updates, as soon as the agenda is known. To increase public input in budget decisions I would be transparent in its development and listen at public comments.”

Hansler: “Absolutely. With more disclosure of consequences and in a format which promotes engagement from residents. The timing depends on urgency and importance. For long-term capital plans, the time can be far in advance with multiple town hall meetings in advance of official decision meetings.”

Hardy: “When I was elected to the Council, my 1st agenda item was a timeline for preparation of the meeting agenda. Paper agendas were being delivered late Friday night for Monday meetings because staff was submitting items late. “The Hardy rule” enabled the City Clerk’s office to publish the agenda by Wednesday night and ease their stress.”

Inouye: “I would support the earlier posting of agendas in order to increase the public input on matters which will be discussed in the City Council meetings.”

Vogler: “Yes. There is little reason not to post notices as early as possible.”

Fair: “Yes, I would support posting meeting agendas earlier (a week in advance if possible) which allows for more time for the public to understand what the agenda is. The public should be allowed to post questions and comments in advance on the agenda site.”

Clifford: “I support posting meeting agendas sooner, I think a week prior will suffice. I believe the public has the ability to voice their concerns at city council meetings. I would promote more town hall meetings to discuss tough issues. “

Clayton-Tarvin: “Yes, as president of the Ocean View School District, I require my staff to post our board agenda 96 hours before our regular meetings rather than 72 hours. As president in 2015, I authored a new board policy allowing 2 sections of public comments, at start and end of meeting as well as the ability to speak on any agenda item. “

What is your perspective on climate change? And what, if any, action plans do you have to address climate change and protect residents?

Britton: “I believe the climate is changing, and if we as humans can mitigate the negative effects of that, we should. Becoming a green city should be our goal, not immediately, but with a reasonable timeline to allow for the changes.” 

Hanson: “I support climate change and I think town halls are needed to make our residents more aware of this issue.”

Burns: “I will let the experts have input and analyze the facts accordingly. “

Hansler: “Climate change is documented. We contribute to global warming and environmental poisoning, and global warming is part of earth’s current evolution. We need to apply critical thinking and less emotion: cell phones pile up in landfills and electric cars are not as environmentally friendly as people wish to believe. Bring more science into decisions.”

Hardy: “Having lived in HB my whole life and listening to family members who have lived here since 1926, the climate is clearly changing. If there is anything humans can do to stop or reverse the effects of climate change, we should take action and start locally. Good environmental decisions can also be good for the city budget.”

Inouye: “I believe that global warming is a clear and present danger to the welfare of all of the residents of Huntington Beach. I would ask the City to conduct a study as to how an increase in the local ocean levels could impact the residents of HB.”

Vogler: “Massive overdevelopment and high density populations have an enormous impacts on climate change. I would reduce the current policy in HB of massive, high-density overdevelopment to protect the environment. I would also propose installing more electric car charging stations throughout the city.”

Fair: “Climate change is real, and we need everyone working together to do what we can to 

reduce our impact. We need to protect our environment and become more sustainable for future generations. There are some reasonable efforts we can take to improve such as learning from other cities that have done this well.” 

Clifford: ” HB can be a leader in supporting alternative energy, I would support using part of the general fund to financially incentivize homeowners who invest in solar panels or draught tolerant landscaping. Since the grid is not setup to handle future energy demands, I think the city should begin investing in solar panels and charging infrastructure.”

Clayton-Tarvin: “Climate change is real, and needs immediate mitigation. I have initiated the “Green Leafy Tree Canopy Initiative.”

What local actions, if any, do you support to reduce greenhouse gas emissions?

Britton: “Build a trolley system. Increase mass transit. Plant more trees. “

Hanson: “I would like to see more solar panels and a program to sell solar panels to residents who desire them.”

Burns: “I will let the experts have input and analyze the facts.”

Hansler: “Save open space, stop high density builds, and make it safe and convenient for personal transportation. Again, complex issues with no easy and quick solutions.”

Hardy: “I was on the Council that created a sustainability project manager. Unfortunately, this position has not been filled in recent years & filling that position is a priority when I return to the Council. This position would work with other departments to ensure that housing, transportation, & ocean protection projects are environmentally sustainable.”

Inouye: “I would support the following actions (partial list) by the City of Huntington Beach as a way to reduce greenhouse emissions: purchase electric vehicles for government-owned vehicles. Install solar panels, which generate electricity for use in City buildings, maintain the HVAC systems to ensure they are operating at peak performance levels.”

Vogler: “See above.”

Fair: “I agree with taking local actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions such as being more energy efficient and using renewable energy sources such as solar. Using more energy efficient models of equipment, appliances, and light bulbs can help reduce energy usage. We can get better at turning off lights and electronics by using sensors and timers.”

Clifford: “I believe vehicles contracted to the city should be transitioned to zero or near-zero emissions if they have not already done so. The city should invest in solar panels and charging infrastructure for passenger vehicles. This could become a future source of revenue for the city. “

Clayton-Tarvin: “School boards and city councils can move to adopt policies to purchase all electric white fleets as well as heavy machinery, and equipment. Leases on oil derricks should not be renewed when allowed, ridding HB of decades of unnecessary fossil fuel extraction. Minimize traffic in HB by implanting public transportation modes.”

Do you believe the last presidential election was stolen?

Britton: “No. “

Hanson: “I believe all 2020 elections were not stolen”

Burns: “I believe there is enough evidence to support a proper investigation to help build a declining confidence in our federal government.”

Hansler: “No. At the same time, the financial and power gains are great and election fraud has been part of our election system since 1900’s. And unless we get control of our boarders we are heading for more problems. My father was an immigrant and legal immigration is a key to the US success. Illegal immigration is a major problem.”

Hardy: “I do not believe the presidential election was stolen.”

Inouye: “NO”

Vogler: “This question is not relevant to the HB City Council election.”

Fair: “I have not seen any credible evidence that supports claims that the election was stolen.”

Clifford: “At this point, I do not have enough information about this topic in order to make an intelligent and informed determination. “

Clayton-Tarvin: “No, it was not stolen.”

Do you believe you are participating in a free and fair election process? Subject to the established rules for recounts, will you accept the results of their election, win or lose, as certified?

Britton: “Yes. Yes. “

Hanson: “Yes and Yes”

Burns: “Yes and most probable if there is no evidence to questionable voting practices. Our system should allow for our practices to be questioned to build confidence amongst our citizens.”

Hansler: “Absolutely and absolutely. Besides since I am not soliciting or accepting or spending any money in the election, unless the voters decide they are ready for serious change, it is highly unlikely I will be elected.”

Hardy: “I believe that both the Huntington Beach City Clerk and Orange County Registrar of Voters run free and fair elections. I will accept the results of the 2022 election.”

Inouye: “Yes and Yes”

Vogler: “Yes.”

Fair: “I believe that we are participating in a free and fair election process, and I will accept the results of the election as certified.”

Clifford: “Yes, I will accept the results of the election, win or lose.”

Clayton-Tarvin: ” Yes, I am participating in a free and fair election process, and I will accept the results of the election. “

Noah Biesiada is a Voice of OC reporter and corps member with Report for America, a Groundtruth initiative. Contact him at nbiesiada@voiceofoc.org or on Twitter @NBiesiada.

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