Don’t Let Edie’s Death From Valley Fever Be In Vain, Her Sister Pleads

Edie Preller had been an in-home health care worker, taking care of other people who were ill. Then, in her 50s, she ended up in a losing battle for her own life, spending her last three years in and out of a hospital. Awareness campaigns could help prevent misdiagnosis.

States Skimp on Valley Fever Awareness

Valley fever infects more than 13,000 people annually in Arizona and California and kills more than 100. Yet the two states spend less on public awareness about the disease in one year than what the Bakersfield City School District spends on lunch milk for a month and less than what Pima County’s Parks and Recreation Department spent on janitorial supplies in 2016.

Researchers Hoping Valley Fever Vaccine Won’t Just Go to the Dogs

A canine vaccine against valley fever, a fungal disease that sometimes leads to significant disability and even death, could be available within the next 10 years. And the work to save dogs could also advance efforts to create a vaccine for people.

Federal Funding Fuels New Valley Fever Research

The National Institutes of Health long ignored valley fever, a disease that mostly affects people in Arizona and California. But it is now providing critical support and researchers say they are “on the cusp of doing some very exciting things.”

Accurate Valley Fever Counts Elude Officials

Estimates of valley fever cases recorded by local, state and federal agencies vary so widely that they call into question the accuracy of the figures released to the public, a Center for Health Journalism Collaborative investigation has found.

New Valley Fever Test Shows Promise, but Obstacles Remain

A new skin test called Spherusol can detect whether a person has developed a natural immunity to valley fever, a sometimes fatal disease caused fungal spores in soil. But despite its promise, the test isn’t in wide use.