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Residents of the homeless encampment along the Santa And River in Anaheim gathered to remember the life of an 18-year-old woman. Cheyenne, known as “Kid,” overdosed on heroin.

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Residents of the homeless encampment along the Santa Ana River in Anaheim, Raymond Lattanzi, left, and Toby Stockham, carry flowers toward a temporary memorial setup for their friend Cheyenne, known as “Kid,” who overdosed on heroin the night before. JEFF ANTENORE, Voice of OC Contributing Photographer Credit: JEFF ANTENORE, Voice of OC Contributing Photographer
Residents of the homeless encampment along the Santa Ana River in Anaheim, Charlotte Kramer, left, and Toby Stockham, arrange flowers on Wednesday morning, May 17, 2017, at a temporary memorial setup for their friend Cheyenne, known as “Kid,” another member of the local homeless community, who overdosed on heroin the night before. JEFF ANTENORE, Voice of OC Contributing Photographer
Members of the local homeless community, and advocates for the homeless, stand around a temporary memorial for “Kid,” an 18-year-old girl who was living at the homeless encampment along the Santa Ana River in Anaheim, and who died of a heroin overdoes the night before, during a vigil on Wednesday, May 17, 2017. JEFF ANTENORE, Voice of OC Contributing Photographer
A temporary memorial with flowers and candles marks the spot where an 18-year-old girl, known to the members of the local homeless community as “Kid,” died of a heroin overdoes on Tuesday night, May 16, 2017, at the homeless encampment along the Santa Ana Riverbed in Anaheim. JEFF ANTENORE, Voice of OC Contributing Photographer

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