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Tibor Rubin was born Hungary on June 18, 1929 and was a Holocaust survivor. He also received a Purple Heart and Prisoner of War Medal.  He died on December 5, 2015.


Editor’s Note:  Voice of OC is honoring some of Orange County’s most notable veterans with profiles. We thank these people, other veterans and those serving today for their dedication and service to our country.


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The President of the United States of America, authorized by

Act of Congress, 3 March 1863, has awarded the Medal of Honor to

 Corporal Tibor Rubin

United States Army

Corporal Tibor Rubin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism during the period from July 23, 1950, to April 20, 1953, while serving as a rifleman with the Company I, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division in the Republic of Korea. While his unit was retreating to the Pusan Perimeter, Corporal Rubin was assigned to stay behind to keep open the vital Taegu-Pusan Road link used by his withdrawing unit. During the ensuing battle, overwhelming numbers of North Korean troops assaulted a hill defended solely by Corporal Rubin. He inflicted a staggering number of casualties on the attacking force during his personal 24-hour battle, single handedly slowing the enemy advance and allowing the 8th Calvary Regiment to complete its withdraw successfully. Following the breakout from the Pusan Perimeter, the 8th Cavalry Regiment proceeded northward and advanced into North Korea. During the advance he helped capture several hundred North Korean soldiers. On October 30, 1950, Chinese forces attacked his unit at Unsan, North Korea, during the massive nighttime assault. That night and throughout the next day, he manned a 30 caliber machine gun at the south end of the unit’s line after three previous gunners became casualties. He continued to man his machine gun until his ammunition was exhausted. His determined stand slowed the pace of the enemy advance in his sector, permitting the remnants of his unit to retreat southward. As a battle raged, Corporal Rubin was severely wounded and captured by the Chinese. Choosing to remain in the prison camp despite offers from the Chinese to return him to his native Hungary. Corporal Rubin disregarded his own personal safety and immediately began sneaking out of the camp at night in search for food for his comrades. Breaking into enemy food storehouses and gardens, he risked certain torture or death if caught. Corporal Rubin provided not only food to the starving soldiers, but also desperately needed medical care and moral support for the sick and wounded of the POW camp. His brave, selfless efforts were directly attributed to saving the lives of as many as forty of his fellow prisoners. Corporal Rubin’s gallant actions in close contact with the enemy and unyielding courage and bravery while a prisoner of war are in the highest tradition of military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.

Orange County Walk of Honor by AMVETS

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More about Tibor Rubin:


Notable Orange County Veterans:

1st Lieutenant Kenneth A. Walsh, Medal of Honor: World War II Fighter Ace

Captain Nelson M. Holderman, Medal of Honor:  World War I Hero

Captain William E. Barber, Medal of Honor: Fought at Iwo Jima

Lance Corporal Kenneth L. Worley, Medal of Honor: Gave His Life for his Country

Lieutenant (J. G.) Donald A. Gary, Medal of Honor: Officer on The USS Franklin in Japan

Master-At-Arms Second Class Michael A. Monsoor, Medal of Honor: Navy Seal Dies While Saving His Comrades

PFC Clarence B. Craft, Medal of Honor: Hastened the End of the Campaign on Okinawa

Sergeant Chris Carr, Medal of Honor: WWII Hero Battled in Italy

Specialist Fourth Class John P. Baca, Medal of Honor: Vietnam Vet Protects His Troops

Staff Sergeant Walter D. Ehlers, Medal of Honor: Stormed Omaha Beach on D-Day

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